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New Drug Designed to Supplement Diabetic Diet and Exercise

Whitney | August 24th, 2012

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The FDA recently approved a new application for the diabetes drug Tradjenta (linagliptin). This drug is traditionally used as a treatment for type II diabetes in combination with a diabetic diet and exercise program. The FDA has now approved use of this drug in combination with insulin for effectively managing the condition and lowering blood sugar levels.

The drug was previously recommended as a supplement to a diabetic diet plan, based on a patient’s specific needs, and including a regular exercise regimen.

Diabetic Diet Gets New Boost

Those who have trouble controlling blood sugar through a diabetic diet and insulin alone may now add Tradjenta to their program. This medication is specifically designed to lower blood sugar when combined with a diet plan and regular exercise. A recent, 52-week trial also suggests the drug can effectively be combined with insulin as an add-on therapy.

Tradjenta is limited to treatment of type II diabetes; it should not be used on patients with type I diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. The drug may cause some side effects, including headaches or joint or back pain. Tradjenta may also interact with other drugs, so it is important for a doctor to know everything a patient is currently taking, including over-the-counter medications and herbal supplements, before Tradjenta is prescribed.

Best Diet for Diabetes: Consult a Doctor

While this new label application by the FDA is good news for type II diabetes sufferers, there is no substitute for a physician-guided diabetic diet.

“We see diabetic patients all the time who lose weight and no longer need insulin,” reports Dr. Michael Kaplan about people who lose weight successfully at The Center for Medical Weight Loss. “When patients lose 5-10 percent of their body weight, it is a given that they will reduce their blood sugar significantly; many no longer need medication.”

The Center for Medical Weight Loss offers physician-directed programs that help clients find the best diet for diabetes, both interms of losing weight for the long term and reversing their condition. According to a study in the American Journal of Medicine, the average client loses 11.1 percent of their total body weight in just 12 weeks, and over 95% maintain weight loss for at least one year.

There are currently over 450 centers from coast to coast that help diabetics and others reach their weight loss goals. Enter your zip code in the box at the right to see if there is a center near you. Special offers are available for first-time clients at select locations.